Viewing Network Topology

To view the Network Toplogy map for a cluster once it has been generated, you can click the “View Toplogy” option in the cluster menu, within the Clusters tab, on the Configuration > Monitoring Collectors page:

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Users require the CONFIGUREVIEW permission to view Network Topology maps.

In the top left corner, you can see the cluster details (name and ID):

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In the top right corner, you can see the date and time when the Network Topology map was generated:

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Understanding Network Topology maps

Each node in the Network Topology map represents one network address. By querying your SNMP-enabled hosts, the Opsview Network Topology feature can populate the map with all detected network addresses, and link them to Opsview hosts that you have previously imported into your Opsview system.

Node styles and their meaning:

“Imported node” - Purple node with solid border:

When resolving the primary addresses of Opsview Hosts monitored by this Cluster, one or more of them resolved to the network address represented by this node.

“Unimported node” - Grey node with dotted border:

When resolving the primary addresses of Opsview Hosts monitored by this Cluster, none resolved to the network address represented by this node.

Therefore, this represents an address that may not currently be monitored by Opsview at all. However, it is possible that it is monitored by Opsview via another cluster.

Node shapes and their meaning:

Circular node:

The SNMP OIDs relating to this network address included capability descriptions that indicated this address was a "Host".

Square node:

The SNMP OIDs relating to this network address included capability descriptions that indicated this address was not a "Host", but was instead another type of network device.

Link styles and their meaning:

Solid purple line:

Represents one or more connections detected between two imported nodes.

Dotted grey line:

Represents one or more connections detected between nodes where one or both of the nodes are unimported.

Imported Nodes

Imported nodes are displayed in the following format:

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The bold labels beneath each node, of which there can be one or many, represent the Opsview hosts with a “Primary address/IP” that resolved to the IP address of the node. The IP address of the node is also represented in a label beneath the Opsview host names.

Note:
If the Network Topology features fails to run detection properly against an SNMP-enabled Opsview host in the cluster, any imported nodes that are linked to that Opsview host will be appended an additional italic label to indicate the failure - this does not mean that detection failed for all Opsview hosts listed, but that it did fail for at least one:

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Unimported nodes

Unimported nodes are displayed in the following format:

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The bold label under the node shows the system name that was detected from the network address. The IP address of the node is also represented in a label beneath.

It may be possible to detect the system name of a node, without knowing the network address, in which case the IP address will be listed as “UNKNOWN”:

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Connections between nodes

The Network Topology map will represent the relationship between different network addresses as lines between their nodes. This indicates that the two systems are network neighbors - that they are able to share packets via the LLDP or CDP protocol.

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Unknown neighbors

Occasionally, it is possible to detect that a node has neighbors, but without knowing either their IP address or their system name. In this case, rather than representing them as nodes on the map, a badge will be shown on the node which has detected them:

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You can hover over the badge with the mouse to see how many of these unknown neighbors are present:

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Using Network Topology maps

Upon loading, the Network Topology map will attempt to space nodes out and improve visibility.

By scrolling, you can zoom the map view in and out.

Nodes will interact with each other on the map to prevent overlap. However, you also have the option of dragging nodes to where you want them to go. When you drag a node, all connected nodes will be dragged along with it.

When you click and drag a node, it will be “fixed” where you place it. This is indicated by a bold border around the node:

“Unfixed” nodes

“Fixed” nodes

Fixed nodes will not interact with other nodes, even if connected, giving you full control over the network layout. If you want a node to interact with other nodes again, you can click it to unfix it.

When you leave the Network Topology map page and return later, nodes will retain their position if they were fixed, even if a new scheduled Network Topology detection runs (as long as they are still picked up by the new detection). Additionally, fixed node positions are shared between users, so if you change the map layout, it will change for all other users too.

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We recommend that after loading your map for the first time, you fix your nodes in place where you want them for ease of use in future, especially if running scheduled Network Topology detection.